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Posts Categorized / Academia

  • Oct 28 / 2015
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Academia, Siobhán O’Connor

Making the most of clinical research networks

Photo by Daria Shevtsova ©. Unsplash. Used with permission.

 

By Siobhán O’Connor

For those public health researchers with a specific clinical background, tapping into a local and national network of clinical researchers can make a huge difference in terms of how your research progresses and opportunities for a long-term research career. Continue Reading

  • Aug 14 / 2015
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Academia, PhD Experience, Ruth Agbakoba

…it’s nice to see you, to see you nice! How to get the best out of a world congress

Photo by Korean Culture and Information Service © 2010. UNESCO WCAE. From Wikimedia Commons.

Photo by Korean Culture and Information Service © 2010. UNESCO WCAE. From Wikimedia Commons.

By Ruth Agbakoba

You may be thinking that this week’s blog post is a tribute to Sir Bruce Forsyth or a reminder of the classic TV show ‘play your cards right’! I know!! L “Come on down” Unfortunately and I’m sorry to disappoint you but it is not entirely. Hopefully I have succeeded in getting your attention though! In my previous post I talked about my ‘five top tips for writing a conference paper’. Now your paper has been accepted (congratulations!) and you are due to attend this amazing conference! What do you do next? Well the purpose of this post is to really highlight and capture how best to participate and gain the most value from a research conference in particular a World Congress. Continue Reading

  • Jul 16 / 2015
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Academia, Tiago Zortea

On sharpening knives, stigma and mental health

By Tiago C. Zortea:

Ten years ago, in the second year of my undergraduate course in Psychology, I came across a short book chapter that caused me to rethink many of the ways in which I understood mental health: The actress, the priest, and the psychoanalyst: The knife sharpeners, written by the Brazilian Professor of Social Psychology Luis Antonio Baptista [1]. Baptista uses the examples of an actress, a priest and a psychoanalyst to explore how ‘public opinion makers’ can indirectly contribute to intolerance and violence against those who they do not consider ‘standard’, ‘holy’ or ‘normal’ respectively. According to the author’s metaphor, they are not directly involved in these people’s death, but they ‘sharpen the knives of the crimes’.

Continue Reading

  • Jul 01 / 2015
  • 0
Academia, Siobhán O’Connor

What Twitter can tell you about our health: Some insights from the 17th International Symposium for Health Information Management Research 2015 (#ISHIMR2015)

By Siobhán O’Connor (@shivoconnor):

The 17th International Symposium for Health Information Management Research 2015 (http://www.ishimr2015.com/) was a real eye opener for me as I got an insight into the power of Twitter analytics and how it can be applied in public health research. A poster presentation by Professor Peter Bath (@PeterABath) from the University of Sheffield on one of his doctoral students’ work demonstrated the value of this amazingly powerful digital health tool. Wasim Ahmed (@was3210) the PhD student in question is using Twitter to understand the Ebola outbreak in Western Africa by collating all the hashtags on #Ebola.

IHAWKES blog 1

Speaking to Wasim after the presentation I was shocked to hear his dataset was in the region of 26 million!!! No small feat for a PhD student to get to grips with. Not surprisingly his poster described the methodological challenges with gathering and analysing this data and some possible solutions for other researchers to follow in the future. No doubt Twitter will become an important data source for numerous health related topics, in particular global health, as more people get online and share their experiences and ideas on the platform. Researchers are only starting to tap into its potential to monitor health related events as they happen in real-time and the wide ranging impact they have on people across the world.

IHAWKES blog 2

Determined to show me some of the nifty analytics that could be done on Twitter, Wasim encouraged me to tweet through the conference at St John’s University in York and showed me his results at the end. It turns out you can very quickly do a lot of clever things on the back of Twitter data such as network analysis and visualisation through a free open-source (love it!!) piece of software called the NodeXL (@nodexl) which creates network overviews and graphs of data through Microsoft Excel. It’s such a quick and easy process that Wasim had the analysis of all the Twitter chat on #ISHIMR2015 done by that very evening the conference finished, after I’d returned to the University of Manchester two hours later. What a turnaround – if only all research analysis was that quick and easy!! PhD students would be laughing!

IHAWKES blog 3

As it turns out, thanks to Wasim’s subtle prompting I became the “most influential” Twitter chatterer at the conference thanks to retweets and favourites by other people who were attending and following online. As you can see from the more advanced analysis image the main discussion revolved around one of the plenary speakers, Professor Frances Mair (@FrancesMair), from the University of Glasgow, and her talk on “Bridging the Translational Gap: Key Issues in Health Informatics Implementation” as she raised several thought provoking ideas around treatment burden and how digital tools can both add to and reduce this for patients.

Well it’s certain, Twitter is becoming an important digital tool that will not just help patients in the future but also public health agencies and frontline doctors, nurses and other staff on the ground by providing them with rich data from which they can make critical decisions to solve health issues facing our society.

  • Jun 03 / 2015
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Academia, Current Research, David Blane

Public health, health inequalities and neoliberalism

Photo by Darko Stojanovic. © Dec. 10, 2014. © CC0 Public Domain via Pixabay.

Photo by Darko Stojanovic. © Dec. 10, 2014. © CC0 Public Domain via Pixabay.

By David Blane

Neoliberalism is bad for your health.  That was the take-home message from Professor Paul Bissell, the invited speaker for the Institute of Health & Wellbeing’s Maurice Bloch seminar series on April 20th 2015.  Prof Bissell began his talk by summarizing the now familiar arguments of Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, from their book The Spirit Level.  Their main thesis, supported with considerable empirical evidence, is that those advanced capitalist countries with the greatest income inequality do worse across a range of health and social outcomes compared to those that are more equal (a case also made in a recent IHAWKES Election Special guest blog by Professor Andy Gumley). Continue Reading

  • May 20 / 2015
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Academia, Matt Jamieson, PhD Experience

Networking advice for introverted researchers

Photo by Samuel Zeller. © 2014. © Creative Commons Zero via Unsplash.

Photo by Samuel Zeller. © 2014. © Creative Commons Zero via Unsplash.

By Matt Jamieson

Every researcher has to network in order to develop their career. However for some this can feel like a difficult and potentially stressful task. Personally I find the idea of approaching admired professors and researchers at conferences daunting, and the prospect of engaging in intellectual conversation as equals seems unlikely. A bit like trying to impress Beyoncé by challenging her to a dance off. With this in mind I asked a few more experienced colleagues how they networked successfully at the beginning of their career and curated together the following pieces of advice: Continue Reading

  • Jan 14 / 2015
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Academia, Ruth Agbakoba

Five top tips for writing a conference paper

© Pexels. 2014. Licensed under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license.

© Pexels. 2014. Licensed under the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) license.

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By Ruth Agbakoba

This is my first ever blog post for IHAWKES and I feel that it is quite a fitting time for me to reflect and share some of my personal experiences as a doctoral student.  I am a final year MRC DTP (Medical Research Council, Doctoral Training Programme) funded PhD Student evaluating the implementation of the Living It Up project (a digital health and wellbeing service) which is part of a £37 million UK wide programme called DALLAS. I am particularly interested in a) how innovative digital technologies and services can be used to enhance health and wellbeing and b) how such interventions can be routinized into people’s daily lives. The project is supported by NHS 24, Scottish Centre for Telehealth and Telecare (SCTT), the Scottish Government and Innovate UK (Department of Health). Continue Reading

  • Dec 03 / 2014
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Academia, Katie Gallacher

Treatment burden: a new agenda for research across the globe

By Katie Gallacher:

Health care providers across the globe are facing one of their biggest challenges yet: the increasing volume of people with chronic disease, and the enormous proportion of those with multimorbidity (more than one long term condition). It seems however, that whilst trying to keep up with demands, governing bodies and policy makers have forgotten one important thing…the patient experience.  Continue Reading

  • Oct 08 / 2014
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Academia, Siobhán O’Connor

Getting over that scholarship hump. You’re too busy? Please apply, here’s why!

By Siobhán O’Connor:

You may wonder as a busy PhD student why you should spend your precious time applying for postgraduate scholarships. You no doubt have a million and one deadlines, a growing stack of articles to read, and a very rough draft of a paper you swore you’d finish weeks ago. However if you have an interest in public health here are my top 10 reasons why you should apply for a Young Forum Gastein (YFG) scholarship.

  1. The YFG scholarship is much more than a travel bursary to attend the European Health Forum Gastein (http://www.ehfg.org/) conference. It also incorporates a jam-packed programme that enables you to interact with over 70 other Young Gasteiners. These scholars are a diverse mix of researchers, policy advisors, economists, doctors, nurses and many other clinicians from all across Europe, who are working in public health. They are eager to share their knowledge and experiences with you which are invaluable to a fledgling researcher.
  2. As the YFG scholarship is jointly sponsored by the International Forum Gastein, the European Commission and the World Health Organisation (WHO), the speakers and delegates at the EHFG conference are senior academics, researchers and policy analysts as well as Members of the European Parliament (MEPs), senior staff from the European Commission, the WHO, industry, and patient organisations. Making these types of contacts at an early stage in your career can give you many more options in the future and help you realise that there is life after your PhD!
  3. Although I have a particular interest in digital health and lapped up the two sessions on eHealth, there is a broad range of public health topics covered. I gained just as much from attending sessions about public health leadership, personalized medicine, and EU health policy to name a few as they gave me new perspectives from which to view my own research. Whatever your area you will find something that intrigues and inspires you.
  4. This forum is also a great way to promote our own research, as there is an opportunity to present a poster. Although only a few are selected, it is worth submitting an abstract as it’s a great experience. You get to practice your presentation and communication skills, and the feedback can really enhance your research.
  5. Getting involved in a working group in another option where you can participate in writing blogs on conference proceedings, interviewing senior attendees, or contributing articles to the daily newsletter. Each working group also debates upcoming EU law such as the new Cross-Border Healthcare Directive. This is a great way to boost your confidence and help improve your written and oral communication skills.
  6. One element of the Young Gastein experience I really valued was the personalised mentoring session. I was lucky to be paired with Professor José Martín-Moreno, a professor of preventative medicine and public health at the University of Valencia. To say he crammed in as much career advice and guidance as possible in an hour is an understatement and it will definitely help to shape my future career choices.
  7. We also received a series of specialised careers talks; one from the WHO, the second from the European Commission, and the third from two public health consultancy firms. They all shared insights into their current roles, discuss how they progressed throughout their careers and outlined the skills that were needed in their professions. A frank Q&A session helped to us to gain an understanding of the pros and cons associated with these careers.
  8. For those of us with burning questions on how the new European parliament is going to tackle public health challenges, we got our questions answered at a one-to-one interview with the newly appointed EU Commissioner-designate for Health and Food Safety, Dr Vytenis Andriukaitis. We were able to pose any question or make a recommendation on what Europe should focus on until 2020. If you have a point to get across then this is the forum to do it.
  9. If you’ve very adventurous then you could also get the opportunity to practice your literary skills, by writing a poem which is broadcast live at the end of the conference, or participate in a video documentary which is available online. And don’t forget to tweet, tweet, tweet – a Young Gasteiner life skill that you will perfect throughout the week!
  10. And of course last but not least being a YFG scholar also means you get to visit beautiful Austria, where you can join early morning hikes into the Alpine mountains, practice yoga at sunrise, relax in the indoor saunas (warning ** these have nudist areas**), spend a day pottering around Salzberg, or try out local brews, gulasch, schnitzel, apfelstrudel and other delicacies. The list is literally endless!

If you are interested in applying check out the website at: http://www.ehfg.org/young-gastein.html or Twitter feed @YoungGasteiners.

Young Forum Gastein Scholars 2014
Young Forum Gastein Scholars 2014
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