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  • Mar 25 / 2019
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Alessio Albanese, Current Research

Researcher showcase: Alessio Albanese and the impact of post-migration life difficulties on mental health

I am in my first year of completing a PhD looking into the impact of post-migration life difficulties on mental health and somatic symptoms. I would like to take this opportunity to present my current work which focuses on the mental health and somatic symptoms of asylum seekers and refugees in the context of post-migration life difficulties. In addition to presenting my research work as it is developing, I would also like to briefly talk about my personal background and how this has influenced my personal and academic development.

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  • Mar 13 / 2019
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Current Research, Lauren Gatting

Promoting some of our ECR’s work

On Tuesday 26th February, Seven Early Career researchers working within UoG’s Institute of Health and Wellbeing presented their work, during the institute’s annual research away day. Following the format of the three minute thesis competitions held in universities worldwide, each presentation had to be under 3 minutes long and use only one power point slide (no animations allowed). During the away day, the presentations were judged by a panel for winners of 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. All the presentations were excellent.

I drew up a brief summary of each person’s work, while they were presenting, which I now present to you:

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  • Mar 11 / 2019
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Academia, Lauren Gatting

Demystifying research impact

During the IHW away-day ’19, Rose-Marie Barbeau presented on research impact, with the aim to clear up any enduring myths and misconceptions. Rose-Marie is the Research Impact Manager at the University of Glasgow. The following are key messages I took from Rose-Marie’s presentation:

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  • Feb 05 / 2018
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Current Affairs, David Blane

Adult weight management – Time for action not words

Photo by Hush Naidoo. © 2017 Unsplash. Used with permission under the license of Creative Commons. Via Unsplash Photos.

By David Blane

 

We hear repeatedly that obesity is one of the biggest public health problems in the UK today.  Yet there is a stark mis-match between the newspaper column inches devoted to the nation’s waistline and the resources spent on NHS adult weight management services.  

ON the 26th October 2017, the Minister for Public Health and Sport, Aileen Campbell, launched the Scottish Government’s Consultation on a Diet and Obesity Strategy for Scotland. There is much to commend in the Strategy – prevention is better than cure, and targeting resources on more ‘upstream’ determinants of obesity (changing the so-called obesogenic environment) is rightly the focus of the new Strategy (and of Obesity Action Scotland’s advocacy).

However, for a country with one of the highest obesity rates in the world (where 1 in every 4 adults lives with obesity), there is a need for action at multiple levels.  As a recent Lancet commentary argued, the distinction between population-level and individual-level approaches is a false dichotomy. Yes, we should be restricting advertising and price promotions of junk food, but we also need high quality, accessible, multi-disciplinary treatment services for those with severe and complex obesity – and not just people with type 2 diabetes (the target of the Strategy). Continue Reading

  • May 30 / 2017
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Current Affairs

On 13 Reasons Why: Acknowledging those working in suicide prevention

Photo by Elisa Riva. © 2017 Pixabay. Used with permission under the license of Creative Commons. Via Startup Stock Photos.

By Katerina Kavalidou 

No matter what you are going through, there is help out there; suicide is not the solution”

The above is an important message from Professor Rory O’Connor, an expert on suicide research and prevention, regarding the recent airing of 13 Reasons Why, a TV series about a teenage girl’s suicide. Reading this, I started thinking about one particular group of people working on suicide prevention: those who pick up the calls at suicide helplines. Continue Reading

  • Oct 19 / 2016
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Academia, Matt Jamieson

A Novice Perspective on Research Funding

Photo by Eric Bailey. © Jul 2014. Used with permission under the license of Creative Commons. Via Startup Stock Photos.

Photo by Eric Bailey. © Jul 2014. Used with permission under the license of Creative Commons. Via Startup Stock Photos.

By Matt Jamieson

I’m a post-doc who has recently completed a PhD. Part of my job is to apply for funding applications for future research. This has brought an uneasy revelation; I need funding to continue doing the work I love, but I have absolutely no idea what I’m doing… Fortunately there’s plenty of useful advice out there for researchers learning how to make successful funding applications. You may also have a grant writing team that you can join at your institution. I’ve summarised some of the tips I’ve been given that took me by surprise or seemed to be particularly important. Continue Reading

  • Oct 05 / 2016
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Current Affairs, Tiago Zortea

Suicide prevention at the individual level: The role of empathy in saving lives

Photo by Korney Violin. © Dec 2015. Used with permission under the license of Creative Commons. Via Unsplash.

Photo by Korney Violin. © Dec 2015. Used with permission under the license of Creative Commons. Via Unsplash.

By Tiago Zortea

 

Every year, the 10th of September marks world suicide prevention day, with thousands of people across the globe calling for action to reduce deaths by suicide and save lives [1]. Suicide prevention strategies can be implemented at several different levels with interventions including: (i) restricting individuals’ access to the means of suicide, (ii) promoting responsible media coverage of suicide, (iii) improving mental health care systems and training health professionals, and finally (iv) ensuring societal support for the implementation of these interventions. Continue Reading

  • Aug 24 / 2016
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Academia, Siobhán O’Connor

Summer Schools for Postgraduate Students – Yea or Nay?

Photo by Alexis Brown © April 13, 2016. Used with permission under the license of Creative Commons.

Photo by Alexis Brown © April 13, 2016. Used with permission under the license of Creative Commons.

By Siobhán O’Connor

I often wondered if research based summer schools run at universities and other organisations were worth investing in as a PhD student. When I heard the European Academy of Nursing Science (EANS) run an annual summer school specifically for nursing researchers, I decided to see if the benefits of attending would outweigh the costs of participating. The 2016 EANS summer school was held at the Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg in Halle, Germany. It brings together nurses and midwives of many specialties from across Europe to develop and promote nursing science. The intensive programme focuses on complex interventions in health and runs numerous workshops and seminars by eminent nursing professors on different research methods used to evaluate nursing interventions. Continue Reading

  • Aug 04 / 2016
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PhD Experience

The Scottish Learning Disability Observatory’s experience of raising public awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with learning disabilities at the Glasgow Science Festival

LDB Archive.

LDO Archive.

By Lisa O’Leary, Laura Hughes McCormack and Kirsty Dunn

We were delighted to have the opportunity to participate in a table top event at the Glasgow Science Sunday birthday bash. We attended this event in order to promote the work of the Scottish Learning Disabilities Observatory, and raise awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with learning disabilities. We also wanted to exchange ideas and network with others who may be interested in our work. We used innovative methods to share what we do at the Scottish Learning Disabilities Observatory with the public. We developed three games:  Continue Reading

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